Director John Ford shows off John Wayne, Maureen O'Hara and the Irish countryside to good effect in "The Quiet Man," a comedic romance on TCM at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, March 17 — St. Patrick's Day.
Director John Ford shows off John Wayne, Maureen O'Hara and the Irish countryside to good effect in "The Quiet Man," a comedic romance on TCM at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, March 17 — St. Patrick's Day.
NEW YORK (CNS) — Here are some television program and film notes for the week of March 12 with their TV Parental Guidelines ratings if available. They have not been reviewed and therefore are not necessarily recommended by Catholic News Service.

Sunday, March 12, 10:30 a.m. - noon PDT (EWTN) "In Concert: Magnificat in C Major." Tom Koopman conducts German composer Johann Kuhnau's Magnificat in C Major (TV-G — general audience).

Sunday, March 12, 1:35-4:34 p.m. PDT (AMC) "The Fugitive" (1993). Having escaped while being transported to the state pen, a Chicago surgeon (Harrison Ford) convicted of murdering his wife must evade the ever-tightening net of a relentless U.S. marshal (Tommy Lee Jones) while desperately tracking down the one-armed man (Andreas Katsulas) who actually killed her. Director Andrew Davis knits together a strong narrative, crackerjack performances and taut editing for a fine thriller not dependent on constant, glorified violence for mounting suspense. Brief, sporadic violence. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Sunday, March 12, 5-7 p.m. PDT (Lifetime) "Just Wright" (2010). This appealing, seamless blend of the best elements of both romantic comedy and inspirational sports films charts the triangular love story of a hardworking physical therapist (Queen Latifah), a professional basketball star (rapper Common) and the attractive but shallow material girl (Paula Patton) who is both her "godsister" and his fiancee. Director Sanaa Hamri and screenwriter Michael Elliot use the lightest of touches to create a warm, likable environment and convey a message about relationships founded on enduring values. Probably acceptable for more mature teens. A single use of rough language, an implied premarital encounter. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating was PG — parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

Wednesday, March 15, 7-8 p.m. PDT (EWTN) "Discovering Patrick: Saint of Ireland." Father Nathan Cromly, of the Community of St. John, and a group of Catholic pilgrims travel to Ireland to walk in the footsteps of St. Patrick while learning about his life, missionary zeal, and enduring legacy (TV-G — general audience).

Friday, March 17, 6:30-9 p.m. PDT (TCM) "The Quiet Man" (1952). When a retired Irish-American boxer (John Wayne) buys a plot of Irish land and courts a lovely colleen (Maureen O'Hara) to go with it, his stubborn bride insists he collect her dowry from her mean-spirited brother (Victor McLaglen). Director John Ford's grand celebration of all-too-familiar Irish stereotypes, ranging from a fondness for spirits to the love of a good fight, is delivered with much broad humor but the movie's universal appeal lies in the robust romance at the heart of the good-natured, old-fashioned story. Comic violence. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association of America.

Saturday, March 18, 3:15-5 p.m. PDT (TCM) "Five Million Years to Earth" (1968). Above-average British science fiction movie in which workers digging a London subway extension find skeletons and an indestructible spacecraft with a prehistoric secret that threatens the entire human race until a brave scientist (James Donald) discovers the origins and meaning of the craft. With good acting, dialogue and special effects, director Roy Ward Baker's unpretentious effort sustains interest and an air of plausibility. Mild violence. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association of America.

Saturday, March 18, 8-9:45 p.m. PDT (HBO) "Ice Age: Collision Course" (2016). Weak fifth installment in the animated franchise for children finds the good-hearted but overprotective father (voice of Ray Romano) of a family of wooly mammoths leading his levelheaded wife (voice of Queen Latifah), sunny daughter (voiced by Keke Palmer) and soon-to-be son-in-law (voice of Adam Devine) on an unlikely quest: They're out to use magnetic rocks to divert a giant asteroid that's headed for a potentially cataclysmic collision with the Earth. Their guide on the journey is an eccentric, British-accented weasel (voice of Simon Pegg). Directed by Michael Thurmeier and Galen Tan Chu, the scattershot proceedings also take in the outer-space adventures of an acorn-obsessed squirrel and a lonely sloth's (voice of John Leguizamo) search for love. While the slapstick comedy around which the shaky plot is built is aimed at kids, some of the vocabulary and humor is inappropriate for them. Parents may also be concerned by a vaguely anti-religious undertone that seems to exalt science at the expense of faith. Occasional peril, mildly scatological and anatomical humor, a single crass term. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating was PG — parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.